Shahjahanabad III: Kashmiri Gate & Northern Old Delhi

The Kashmiri Gate area of Shahjahanabad is the small bit that lies to the north of Old Delhi railway station, while the bulk of Shahjahanabad lies to its south. A railway station in 19th c. Delhi had become a necessity due to the growing rail network of British India and the increasing British interest in Delhi (they had essentially controlled Delhi since 1803), however the location of Old Delhi station was probably dictated by retributionary passions after the uprising of 1857, since the introduction of the rail lines and station in their current alignment meant the clearing of a large swath of the city. The railway lines and station also conveniently divided Old Delhi into two, and the British began concentrating in the northern part of the city. This is also partly the reason why the original Civil Lines and cantonment lie to the north of Shahjahanabad.

At the beginning of the 20th c. then, the Kashmiri Gate area was a very British part of Shahjahanabad, and the buildings tend to reflect that as well. In this post I have concentrated on the more densely built-up area to the west of Lothian Road. You can find my other main posts covering Shahjahanabad here, and these photos are also on flickr.

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Location of Old Delhi railway station and the area of Shahjahanabad north of the station

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General sequence of areas photographed

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Kashmiri Gate

This is all that remains of the famed Kashmiri Gate itself, with the new Delhi Metro station located uncomfortably close to the monument.

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Just south of Kashmiri Gate

The area immediately south of Kashmiri Gate was an important commercial area well into the 1970s and 80s, but has lost out in the past few decades. As it is, it’s a very interesting area to explore architecturally.

The original St Stephens College building, now government offices

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Along Ram Lal Chandok Marg

This is a small street that merges with Lothian Road near Kashmiri Gate.

Lal Masjid

Along Ram Lal Chandok Marg

Art Deco residence

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Lothian Road

This is the main thoroughfare that connects the Kashmiri Gate area with the main part of Shahjahanabad, going under the railway lines that separates them.

Minerva Cinema, now defunct, on a side street off Lothian Road

Along Lothian Road

Further along Lothian Road are large colonial and modernist post office buildings

Also on Lothian Road are the remains of the British magazine, a victim of the 1857 revolt, with interesting dueling commemorative plaques put up by the British and subsequently by the Indians

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Nicholson Road

This narrow street along the old city walls is really interesting, lined with early-20th c. buildings.

The beginning of Nicholson Road near Kashmiri Gate

Side street leading away from Nicholson Road

Nicholson Road running parallel to Shahjahanabad’s walls

Buildings along Nicholson Road

More Art Deco

Building at the end of Nicholson Road

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Within the Kashmiri Gate area

These next few images are from inside the more densely built-up area at the core of northern Old Delhi.

03 more mori gate

Bungalows within the area, dating from the 19th c.

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Along Hamilton Road

This road runs parallel with and next to the railway lines.

Modernist building

More art deco (lite)

5 thoughts on “Shahjahanabad III: Kashmiri Gate & Northern Old Delhi

  1. You have taken a lot of pains to immortalised these buildings before they vanish sooner or later. Good work. Having been trained in architecture, the viewpoints chosen by you for taking pics of these buildings have been very appropriate. Good work. Keep it up.

    BTW, I identified one board – Pt. Ashok Kashyap, handwriting expert. I happened to visit his office once decades ago.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Shahjahanabad IV: Fatehpuri Masjid & Katra Bariyan | Sarson ke Khet

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